King County--Seattle

seattle chinatown, chinatown gate, chinese gate
Historic Chinatown Gate

Bilingual Street Signs. King County.
Bilingual street signs began appearing in Seattle’s Chinatown International District of the City of Seattle in 2013. More than 30 intersections have English language street names translated into the traditional Chinese language. Reference: “New Bilingual Street Name Signs Unveiled in the Chinatown International District” 2013. Photo.

Bing Kung Tong Association Apartments. King County.
The Bing Kung Tong Association Apartments is at 418-424 7th Avenue S. adjacent to Canton Alley in the City of Seattle. The four story structure was built in 1916 for the association and houses the Bing Kung Tong Association. The building has also been known as the Norway Hotel and New American. See Canton Alley, King County. Reference: Chin and Chin 2013: 87; “Seattle’s Chinatown International District.”

Bing Kung Tong Temple. King County.
Bing Kung Tong Temple was located in the Bing Kung Association Apartments via the entrance at 708 King Street S. City of Seattle. It dates to 1917. Reference: “Seattle’s Chinatown International District.”

Calvary Cemetery. King County.
Calvary Cemetery is at 5041 35th Avenue NE in the City of Seattle. It is the burial site of Locke Sam Fun, often known as the mayor of Chinatown in the early days. Reference: Find a Grave.

Canton Alley. King County.
Canton Alley in the City of Seattle is between 7th Avenue S. and 8th Avenue S. and extends from King Street S. to Weller Street S. The passage way is between the East and West Kon Yick buildings. It was a place for vegetable sellers and play area for children in early Chinatown. It was converted to a public space for community events in 2017. See East Kon Yick Building, King County--Seattle, King County and West Kon Yick Building, King County--Seattle. References: “Canton, Nord & Pioneer Passage Alley Improvement Project;” “Seattle alleys getting a face lift.” Photo.

Canton Building. King County.
Canton Building was at 208-210 Washington Street S. in the City of Seattle. Built in 1894, the three story brick structure was also known as the Kon Yick Building and Chin Gee Hee Building. Chin, an entrepreneur, was active in civic and political matters. He had the building constructed. The structure was destroyed in 1971 with a federal building taking its place. Reference: “Chin Gee Hee.” Photo.

Cathay Post No. 186. King County.
Cathay Post No. 186 The American Legion is located at 719 King Street S. in the City of Seattle. It was first established at 8th Avenue S. and Jackson Street S. in 1946 by returning Chinese Americans who were denied membership in other posts. The post remains active in veteran affairs and community activities. Reference: “Cathay Post #186 connects its past in the community with the future;” Reference: “Cathay Post No. 186: A Legacy of Camaraderie, Community, and Patriotism.”

Chen Kong Tong Joss House King County.
Chen Kong Tong Joss House was next door to the Hip Sing Tong Building at 4th Avenue S. and Washington Avenue S. by 1901. See Hip Sing Tong Joss House, King County--Seattle. Reference: “Shrines.”

Chin Gee Hee Building. King County.
See Canton Building, King County--Seattle.

Chinese American Soldiers Memorial. King County.
The Chinese American Soldiers Memorial is in the northeast corner of Hing Park at 423 Maynard S., City of Seattle. It is dedicated to the eight Chinese American soldiers of Seattle and vicinity who died in World War II. See Hing Hay Park, King County--Seattle. Reference: “Chinese American Soldiers Memorial.”

Chinese Baptist Church Building. King County.
Chinese Baptist Church Building is located at 925 King Street S. in the City of Seattle. The Late Gothic Revival Style brick building was completed in 1924. It was an important center for social and religious activities in Chinatown. Many still remember its nursery school. The building is on the National Registry of Historic Places. Reference: “Chinese Baptist Church 1986.” Photo.

Chinese Community Bulletin Board. King County.
The Chinese Community Bulletin Board is on the east wall at 511 7th Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. Posting on the bulletin board dates to the 1890s when there was no Chinese language newspaper. The present one began in the 1960s and contains written information in Chinese and English. It was designated a Seattle Historic Landmark in 1976. Reference: “Chinese Community Bulletin Board.” Photo.

Chinese Opera House. King County.
The Chinese Opera House was at 514-518 7th Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. Built in 1923, the building was the home of a Cantonese opera company by 1924. Although it was the first Chinese opera group in the United States, it was unsuccessful and the building becoming a restaurant in 1929. Reference: “Cantonese Opera in King County.” Photo.

Chinese School. King County.
The building occupied by the Chinese school was located at 12th Avenue S. and E. Yesler Way. Occupying the first floor in the early 1900s, it taught Chinese language, culture, history and Confucianism. Chinese students, 5-18 years of age, attended after public school and on Saturdays. The school relocated to the Chong Wa Benevolent Association Building around 1929. See Chong Wa Benevolent Association Building, King County--Seattle. Reference: Chin and Chin 2013: 80, 95, 186.

Chinese Village. King County.
Chinese Village was located in the northern part of the main though fare next to the Ferris wheel during the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition held on the University of Washington campus, Seattle. The village featured a temple, restaurant, theater and provided transportation via rickshaws. King Eng Ah, an unofficial mayor of Chinatown, developed and managed the exhibit with almost all Seattle Chinese contributing $4.00 for its construction. References: Dougherty 2013; Dougherty 2009; Ott 2009. Photo.

Chinn Apartments. King County.
See Hip Sing Tong Building, King County--Seattle.

Chong Wa Benevolent Association Building. King County.
The Chong Wa Benevolent Association Building is located at 522 7th Avenue S., City of Seattle. Built in 1929, it is a two story brick building designed by Sam Chin, the first Chinese American architect licensed in the state of Washington. The first floor holds the Chinese school with the second floor being a large meeting room. The association is an umbrella organization representing many groups of Chinatown. It has been in operation since at least 1892. Reference: “A New Date for the Founding of Seattle’s Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (Chong Wa);” Chin and Chin 2013: 95; 187. Photo.

Danny Woo International District Community Garden. King County.
Danny Woo International District Community Garden is at 310 Maynard Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. The 1.5 acres community garden is on land donated by Danny Woo in 1975. It contains terraces for growing vegetables, individual garden plots, and dozens of fruit trees. Reference: “Danny Woo International District Community Garden.” Photo.

Donnie Chin International Children’s Park. King County.
Donnie Chin International Children’s Park is located at 700 Landers Street S., City of Seattle. Within the Seattle’s Chinatown International District, it was named after activist Donnie Chin. It was established in 1981 and renovated in 2012. Reference: “Donnie Chin International Children’s Park.” Photo.

Dragons on Lamp Posts. King County.
Lamp posts along Fifth Avenue S., Dearborn Street and Jackson Street S. in the City of Seattle display dragons on the lamp posts. The 11 dragons are constructed of fiberglass and plaster. Installed in 2002, the dragons were created by Meng Huang and Heather Presler. See Street Lamp Posts, King County--Seattle. Reference: “Walking Tour Map.” H2 Chinatown/International District (CID). Photo.

Duwamish Poor Family Cemetery. King County.
Duwamish Poor Family Cemetery was near Corson Avenue S. and S. Lucille Street in the community of Georgetown (now part of Seattle). Established around 1876, the King County Hospital and Poor Farm was adjacent. Demolished in 1912, the cemetery contained four Chinese graves. References: Chinn; Wilma 2001.

East Kon Yick Building. King County.
East Kon Yick Building is at 714 King Street S. in the City of Seattle. The four story brick building, constructed in 1910, was the result of the Kon Yick Investment Company. Goon Dip and 170 Chinese investors pooled their resources to construct it as well as the West Kon Yick Building. Having served as a hotel, family apartments, headquarters for various family associations and stores, it now houses the Wing Luke Museum. See West Kon Yick Building, King County--Seattle; Wing Luke Museum, King County--Seattle. Reference: “East Kon Yick Building.”

Eastern Hotel. King County.
Eastern Hotel is at 506-510 Maynard Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. It was built in 1911 for the Wa Chong Company and Chin Chun Hock. The four story brick building was originally a boarding house with a barber shop and film theater. The movie house was one of the first in the city. The building was designated a Seattle Historic Landmark in 1977. Reference: “Eastern Hotel.”

First Chinatown. King County.
Chinese shops were initially established on Western Street, (in the area of today’s Alaska Way Viaduct) on what was then the water front. By the 1860s to 1870s, they moved to Washington Street S. between 2nd Avenue S. and 4th Avenue S. The Quong Tuck Company and the Canton Building were the center. Living quarters were on the back streets toward Washington Street S. and Main Street S. in an east-to-west direction and along 1st Avenue S. and Occidental Avenue S. in a north-to-south direction. Filling and regarding of Jackson Street S. resulted in Second Chinatown. First Chinatown was still evident by 1925. See Canton Building, King County--Seattle; Second Chinatown, King County--Seattle. References: Chew and Chinn 2008: 182-185; “Chin Gee Hee;” Hildebrandt 1977: 24.

Goon Dip Building. King County.
Goon Dip Building is at 664-676 King Street S. in the City of Seattle. The five story brick building was built for Goon Dip in 1911. It is also known as the Milwaukee Hotel. Reference: “Seattle Chinatown Historic District.” Photo.

Goon Dip Burial Site. King County.
Goon Dip Burial Site is within the Lake View Cemetery at 1554 15th Avenue E. in the City of Seattle. Goon Dip (1862-1933) was a civic leader, entrepreneur, and labor contractor. He was honored in Alaska with the place names of Goon Dip Mountain and Goon Dip River on Chichagof Island where he was in a gold mine partnership. See Goon Dip Building, King County--Seattle. References: “Death;” Chesley 2009.

Hing Hay Park. King County.
Hing Hay Park is at 423 Maynard Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. The community park opening in 1975, features a pavilion, benches and chess tables. A recent addition in 2017 almost doubled its size to 0.5 acres with a grand opening in 2018. Hing Hay translates to “Park for Pleasurable Gathering.” See Chinese American Soldiers Memorial, King County--Seattle; Hing Hay Park Dragon Mural, King County--Seattle. References: “Hing Hay Park;” “Hing Hay Park Renovation.” Photo.

Hing Hay Park Dragon Mural. King County.
A large dragon mural is displayed at the park. The public art is an imperial dragon for it has five toes, representing luck, and power. Reference: “Chinese Dragons—Facts, Culture, Origins, and Art.” Photo.

Hip Sing Association Building. King County.
Hip Sing Association Building is located at 418-422 8th Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. Built in 1910, the four story structure is constructed of concrete with a masonry exterior. It has been known as the Chinn Apartments. Reference: “Seattle Chinatown Historic District.”

Hip Sing Tong Joss House. King County.
Hip Sing Tong Joss House was located at 4th Avenue S. and Washington Avenue S. in the City of Seattle by 1900. It relocated to Main Street S. between 5th and 6th Avenue S., ultimately moving to 8th Avenue S. near the corner of King Street S in 1917. Reference: Chew and Chinn 2003: 184; Chin and Chin 2003: 77, 86; “Shrines.”

Historic Chinatown Gate. King County.
Historic Chinatown Gate extends over King Street S. east of 5th Avenue S. in the City of Seattle. The 45 foot archway marks the west end of Chinatown within Seattle’s Chinatown International District. Designed by Paul Wu and Ming Zhang, it was dedicated on February 9, 2008. Reference: “Historic Chinatown Gate (Seattle).” Photo.

Kin On Community Health Care. King County.
Kin On Community Health Care is at 4416 Brandon Street, City of Seattle. The nursing home for seniors was the result of the Chinese Community Coalition Committee. Originally named Kin On Nursing Home, it was renamed Kin On Community Health Care in 1997. Reference: “Kin On.”


Kin On Nursing Home. King County.
See Kin On Community Health Care, King County.

Kon Yick Building. King County.
See Canton Building. King County—Seattle.

Lake View Cemetery. King County.
Lake View Cemetery is located at 1554 15th Avenue E. in the City of Seattle. It is considered the home village cemetery for the early Chinese. Recent burials are Bruce Lee and his son, Brandon. References: “Where is Bruce Lee grave located;” “Lake View Cemetery--Seattle.”

Lung Kong Tin Yee Joss House. King County.
Lung Kong Tin Yee Joss House was on the third floor of the Canton Building at 208-210 Washington Street S. in the City of Seattle. It was still present around 1911. Reference: “The only known Chinese Temples—“Joss Houses”—in Seattle before modern times.”

Methodist Episcopal Church. King County.
Located at Fourth Avenue E. and Columbia Street E., Methodist Episcopal Church in the City of Seattle held evening services for the Chinese in 1880. A school was established there in 1882 with approximately 40 children attending. Reference: Chew and Chinn 2003: 180.

Milwaukee Hotel. King County.
See Goon Dip Building, King County--Seattle.

Montlake Cut. King County.
Montlake Cut links Lake Washington with Puget Sound in Seattle. Digging was initially done by
Chinese laborers under contract to the Wa Chong Company. The cut is 2500 feet in length and 350 feet wide. The path adjacent to the cut was designated a National Recreation Trail. See Wa Chong Company Store, King County--Seattle. References: Riddle; Montlake Cut.

Mount Pleasant Cemetery. King County.
Mount Pleasant Cemetery is at 700 W. Raye Street, City of Seattle. The “Old Chinese” section contains more than 200 early Chinese graves. The section was once used by Chong Wa Benevolent Association. See Chong Wa Benevolent Association, King County--Seattle. Reference: Chinn, “Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Seattle.”

Occidental Park Historic Marker. King County.
Occidental Park Historic Marker is at Occidental Park, 1175 Washington Street S., City of Seattle. The marker (Panel 2) titled, “Urban Frontier” notes the protection of the Chinese and their brief exodus from the area in 1886. Reference: “Pioneer Square Historic District Marker.”

Republic Hotel. King County.
Republic Hotel is at 410-416 7th Street S., City of Seattle. The four story brick building was built for the Ding Association in 1920. Reference: “Republic Hotel Phase II environmental Site Assessment (ESA).”

Ruby Chow Park. King County.
Ruby Chow Park is at 13th Avenue S. and S. Hardy Street, City of Seattle. Ruby Chow was the first Asian American member of the King County Council as well as a community and civic activist. See Ruby Chow’s Restaurant, King County--Seattle. Reference: Chesley 2007.

Ruby Chow’s Restaurant. King County.
Ruby Chow’s restaurant was at 1122 Jefferson Street, City of Seattle. It opened in 1948 and was the first Chinese restaurant outside of Chinatown. Owned and operated by Ruby and husband Ping, it was a favorite spot of politicians, governors, and activists. Bruce Lee, actor, had lived and worked there. Reference: “Ruby Chow.”

Seattle Chinatown International District. King County.
Seattle Chinatown International District is presently defined as Fifth Avenue S to Rainier Avenue and from Yesler Way to S. Dearborn Street, City of Seattle. The delineation is according to the City of Seattle for planning purposes. The boundaries have changed through the years, beginning at least to the 1950s. The district is currently home for Asian immigrants, the elderly, and organizations and businesses for Asian Americans, Euro Americans, African Americans, and Native Americans. It was officially established by the City of Seattle as a historic district (1973) and is on the National Registry of Historic Places (1986). References: Chin 2009: 83, 85, 123, 125; “Seattle’s Chinatown Historic District” 1986Photo.

Seattle Chinese Detention Center. King County.
Seattle Chinese Detention Center was located in a building at 1634 15th Avenue, City of Seattle. It was in operation from 1907 to 1916. It processed recent immigrants from China, Japan and Asian Indians. The building still stands. Reference:”Detaining Asians at Seattle’s Angel Island, 1907-1916.”

Seattle Chinese Garden. King County.
Seattle Chinese Garden is on the campus of South Seattle Community College at 6000 16th Avenue SW in the City of Seattle. It covers more than four acres and is in the Sichuan garden style. It is open to the public. Reference: “Seattle Chinese Garden.”

Sing Keong Family Association Building. King County.
Located at 512-516 Maynard Avenue S., Sing Keong Family Association Building is in the City of Seattle. The one story structure was built in 1906 and provided housing and retail space. Reference: “Seattle’s Chinatown International District.”

Street Lights. King County.
Decorative street lights are found throughout Seattle’s Chinatown International District. Each has a red base, white pole, and red lantern-like light fixture. “Pedestrian Lighting in Chinatown International District.” Photo.

Tea Cups Public Art. King County.
A montage of tea cups is on display at the International District/Chinatown Branch of the Seattle Public Library at 713 8th Street, City of Seattle. Executed by Rene Yung, its dramatic lighting illuminates many of the styles, glazes, and colors of Asian tea cups. Photo.

Wa Chong Company Store. King County.
Wa Chong Company Store was originally on stilts next to the tidal flats just south of Yesler’s mill (now Occidental Avenue in Pioneer Square). Opened by Chin Chun Hock in 1868, it moved several times, ultimately staying at East Kong Yick Building at S. 719 King Street. The company was an import/export business, specializing in labor contracts. See East Kong Yick Building, King County--Seattle. References: Chew and Chin 2003: 177; Riddle 2014.

West Kong Yick Building. King County.
West Kong Yick Building is at 508-510 7th Avenue S, City of Seattle. It was built in 1910 by the Kon Yick Investment Company. The four story brick building resulted from Goon Dip and 170 Chinese investors pooling their resources to construct it as well as the nearby West Kon Yick Building. It has served as a hotel, restaurant locations and stores. See East Kon Yick Building, King County—Seattle. References: “East Kon Yick Building;” “Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific America Experience.”

Wing Luke Elementary School. King County.
Wing Luke Elementary School is located at 3701 S. Kenyon Street in the City of Seattle. Opening in 1917, it was named in honor of Wing Luke, civil rights advocate, first Asian American to sit on the Seattle City Council, and Washington State Assistant Attorney General. References: Chin 2013: 110,114; “Seattle Schools.”

Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience. King County.
Often referred to simply as the Wing Luke Museum or “The Wing,” the museum is located at 719 S. King Street, City of Seattle. Established in 2008, it resides in the East Kon Yick Building. Its name is taken from Wing Luke, civil rights activist, Seattle city council member, and Washington State Assistant Attorney General. The museum features exhibits of a family association, Freeman SRO Hotel, Yick Fung mercantile store, plus thousands of artifacts, and walking tours within Chinatown International District. See East Kon Yick Building, King County--Seattle. Reference: “Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.” Photo.

United Savings and Loan Bank Building. King County.
United Savings and Loan Bank Building is at 601 S. Jackson Street, City of Seattle. It was the first Chinese American owned bank in the state of Washington, opened by Robert Chinn in 1960. The bank merged with another in 2003, changing owners and names through the years. Presently, the building houses the Washington Federal Bank. References: Chew and Chinn 2003: 195; U.S. Bank Locations.

References
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